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Patch & Remington is a space dedicated to art and community in downtown Marcellus.

 

Founded by Anthony Ruacho and Sarah Ayers, Patch & Remington is a dedication to the community that the building has housed for over 120 years.
Featuring art, cultural experimentation, and community-centered collaborations, Patch & Remington will continue to be a hub for experimental creativity.
  • After Effects

    Curated by Taylor Childs
    THE EXHIBITION AFTER EFFECTS, TAKES A LOOK AT LIFE AFTER THE DIASPORA. EXPLORING RACE, CLASS, IDENTITY AND INCLUSION THROUGH ART. THIS SHOW IS GUEST CURATED BY TAYLOR CHILDS AND CAN BE VIEWED VIRTUALLY AT WWW.PATCHANDREMINGTON.COM  OR IN PERSON AT PATCH & REMINGTON 115 E. MAIN STREET, MARCELLUS, MI 49067.

     

    Marginalized people still deal with after effects of the Diaspora today. Whether it is mental health, racial tension, accessibility to resources and knowledge, unfair pay, etc. If we look at the word “marginalized,” we’re talking about a person, group, or concept that has been left out, treated as insignificant and oftentimes misjudged. When I think of those terms, I think about the indigenous communities where skin color adds as a tax on their lives. The color of their skin acts as a film to further perpetuate the stereotypes that already exist. African Americans have left the Diaspora, not truly addressing their trauma, but instead continuing life and pushing through other layers of discrimination with hope to be treated equally. This is an after effect of the diaspora.

     

    The idea of an African American woman curating a space and giving an opportunity to showcase work from perspectives that are not generally included in mainstream art spaces, is evidence that the civil revolutionaries and colored artists before me have knocked down those doors. Even though this progress is slow, it is progress nevertheless. In the exhibition, After Effects we celebrate all aspects of Blackness, and also highlight the after effects of the Diaspora. This includes themes of trauma, identity, perception, class but also life, revival, love, and showcasing the black perspective. I know this exhibition will act as soul work for those who open themselves up to the stories and perspectives of the artists. More importantly, the hope is to create a space where these stories can be told, unfiltered. So that we continue the discussion of equality but also progress in the understanding and ultimate healing of all people.